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Teaching Overview

In the classroom, I encourage students to be energized by the diversity of opinions around them, take intellectual risks, and hone their critical thinking skills. I operate from the belief that the classroom experience should be a collaborative, dynamic learning community where ideas and concepts are respectfully explored and all students are heard and treated with dignity. Below you will find more information about the courses I teach. I've also included information about my participation as a mentor in the Dean's First-Year Research and Creative Scholars (DFRACS) program. 

My teaching motto is "Learning is FUN!"

Amy web res 13 of 15.jpg

Courses

Classes in the Hubbard School of Journalism & Mass Comm

JOUR 4259 - Strategic Communication Case Analysis - View Syllabus

JOUR 1918: Brand Advocacy & Activism View Syllabus

JOUR 4244 - Crisis Communication - View Syllabus

Classes in the University Honors Program

HSEM 2043: Finding the Corporate Soul

HSEM: CSR in Minnesota Mining

HCOL 3102: Honors Thesis

What My Students Say

"Amy was one of the kindest, smartest, and most passionate professors I have had in my entire college experience. I could sum my experience up with her as 'someone that cares about learning and is passionate about teaching.'"

Fall 2020, JOUR 4259, Strategic Communication Case Analysis

DFRACS Mentor

Mentoring Dean's First-Year Research And Creative Scholar (DFRACS) students has been a highlight of my spring semesters since 2015. My goal as a mentor is twofold: 1) to introduce students to the research process and 2) to get them excited about doing research.

 

Past DFRACS projects have included reading academic literature, participating in group literature discussions, and extracting/coding research data. While the specific tasks vary year to year,  DFRACS students who work with me report having a greater understanding and appreciation for research (and CSR!) after their program has ended. They also say participating in research increased their communication, analysis, and synthesis skills.

A DFRACS student offered: 

"Working with Amy was fantastic! It was a great experience learning and applying a variety of qualitative methods. Also, she is simply a terrific human being, mentor, and friend."

Students and Professor at a Mine
DFRACS students, Shayla Miller and Ian Gullickson, learned about fieldwork at the Hibbing Taconite mine (Summer 2021)
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